Free León City Tour

Leon is an interesting city to walk around, but it’s always better to have a guide! I happened to find a new company that offers free walking tours every morning so did the tour on Thursday. The tour lasted 90 minutes and covered the centre of the city. I learned more about the history of the city, the country and some of the murals depicting these stories. On the tour with me were a Canadian couple and 3 Germans. Germans and Canadians are the most common tourists in Nicaragua right now.

I already mentioned the enormous amount of churches here, and the guide, Sebastian, pointed out León is known as a city of churches as there are 2 Catholic churches per neighbourhood here. I don’t know why that’s necessary but the churches are pretty to look at and have some crazy icons inside. He also informed us that the main cathedral has tunnels to 5 different churches in the city. These were created to fend off pirates!

Cathedral de León
Crypt entrance in the Cathedral of León

Sebastian also provided us a lot of history of the revolutionary movement, the Sandinistas, the U.S. vs. U.S.S.R, and the demonstrations that led to the deaths of students and innocents in the city of León. Nicaragua suffered a lot through those years, and the pain and struggles, and hope for peace and recovery, is evidenced in a lot of the murals around the city.

He highlighted this mural –

Sandino Murals León
The Sandino Murals

on the left is a historical Sandino with his foot on Somoza’s head and the struggling farmers and sugar cane workers. Somoza’s family ran the country from the 30s to the 70s, and just after signing a peace pact with him, killed Sandino, the father of the revolution.

Sandino
Left Sandino, with Somoza underfoot
Sandino
Right Sandino, with Uncle Sam under foot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the right is the modern day (this was created in the 80s) Sandino, with Uncle Sam under his foot and anti-American expressions. He also gave us a version of the origin of the term “Gringo” – that the U.S. troops wore green and the locals wanted them gone, so in simple English “Green. Go” = gringo. That doesn’t seem to be true, but it is a colorful story.

He showed us some more revolutionary murals, including one dedicated to a student peaceful protest that ended with the military attacking the protesters.

León mural
Mural of a León protest turned tragedy

We also learned about the volcanic activity around León and the fact that there is an Old León buried nearby and the survivors of the volcanic eruption had to create a new city where we currently are now.

Our final stop was a courtyard at the University (UNAN) which housed a special exhibit to the country’s famed poet and writer Rubén Darío. It was free to enter and they have some beautiful gardens in the building. I really like how so much of the landscaping here seems like an homage to Edward Scissorhands. Or maybe it’s just me.

Garden at UNAN León
Garden at UNAN León